Two Search and Rescue Missions on San Francisco Peaks Wednesday

FLAGSTAFF – Coconino County Sheriff’s deputies and its Search and Rescue Unit conducted two search and rescue missions on the San Francisco Peaks Wednesday

About 3:00 p.m. Wednesday October 11, 2017 the Flagstaff 911 Center received a call from a woman who reported she was lost after starting a hike the Peaks. The woman and her three children—ages 2-to-11—from the Phoenix area had parked on the Snowbowl Road and started off on a hike. The woman reported she was currently on a trail, but was confused and did not know the way to return to her vehicle.

Deputies were able to get her location from her call to 911 and had her start walking out. A deputy responded to the area, who walked in on the trail, meeting the woman and assisting her back to her parked car.

About 6:35 p.m. the Flagstaff 911 Center received another call for a rescue on the Peaks. A 19-year old male and his girlfriend from the Phoenix area were hiking the Humphreys Trail when the male injured his ankle and reported a possible fracture.

The Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue unit responded and prepared for a liter carry of the injured hiker. The hiker had been able to make his way partial down the trail. Searchers made their way up the trail and made contact with the hiker and assisted him off the mountain. The hiker refused medical treatment.

71-Year-Old Female from Cameron Found

On Sunday, October 1st at approximately 8:30 pm, the Coconino County Sheriff’s Office received a call that a female from Cameron had gotten separated from her family while picking pinon nuts on Grey Mountain. Sheriff’s Office Patrol Division and Navajo Police Department responded.

A search began Sunday night and continued through this morning. The Sheriff’s Office was assisted by the Arizona Department of Public Safety Air Rescue, Flagstaff Fire Department Fuels Crew, Navajo Police Department and the Navajo Rangers.

This morning at approximately 10:50 am, the Flagstaff Fire Department Fuels Crew search team assigned to a search segment, located a female with altered level of consciousness. Responders began treatment and she was transported by the Arizona Department of Public Safety Air Rescue for medical evaluation and follow up.

The Sheriff’s Office thanks all the agencies that were involved in the search efforts.

County Parks and Recreation Receives Natural Resource Award

FLAGSTAFF – Coconino County Parks and Recreation (CCPR) received the Natural Resource Award from Arizona Parks and Recreation Association for Rogers Lake Recreation improvements. Since 2011, CCPR has been incorporating recreation improvements at Rogers Lake County Natural Area while celebrating sustainability with residents and visitors.

Enhancements to the natural area were intended to engage the visitors and designed sustainably by using repurposed materials. The award acknowledges the hard work, ingenuity and dedication that CCPR staff has made.

“I’m proud of our Parks and Recreation team for the work that they do and congratulate them on their award and recognition from the Arizona Parks and Recreation Association,” said Chairwoman of the Board of Supervisors, Liz Archuleta. “Striving for a healthy, close-knit community, while taking steps to improve the environment is something that we take great pride in at Coconino County.”

The awarded sustainable features completed by CCPR staff in the natural area in 2016 and 2017 include:

  • A watchable wildlife viewing platform that overlooks the lake.
  • A 6-mile trail system and two trailheads with parking at the county natural area.

Other environmentally friendly improvements CCPR has made to the natural area include:

  • A ramada structure built from recycled lumber that diverts rainwater to a water feeder for birds, bats and small mammals.
  • Two trailheads and parking lots made from milled asphalt that came from a Highway 89A alignment project near Fort Tuthill County Park.
  • Trail surface made from repurposed, engineered crushed stone originating from a renovation project from Flagstaff Pulliam Airport.

Please visit the improved county natural area for some watchable wildlife opportunities during the fall season.

Nominations open for 2018 Coconino County Teacher of the Year and Rookie Teacher of the Year

FLAGSTAFF – The sixth annual Coconino County 2018 Teacher of the Year and first annual Rookie Teacher of the Year Award nominations are now open. These awards recognize the contributions of state-accredited, full-time teachers from pre-kindergarten – 12th grade in Coconino County.

The Teacher of the Year awards recognize three exceptionally skilled and dedicated teachers, and rookie teachers, who have gained respect and admiration of students, parents and colleagues. These teachers inspire students of all backgrounds and abilities to learn and are passionate about education.

Teachers must be nominated or self-nominated to be considered for either award. If nominated, teachers submit a detailed essay application with letters of support. The top six candidates for each award will then be interviewed. The Teacher of the Year, Rookie Teacher of the year, as well as two ambassadors for excellence and two Rookie Ambassadors for Excellence will be selected by a panel of judges.

All finalists will be recognized at the awards event in the spring and will receive cash prizes. The Teacher of the Year will receive an automatic nomination for the Arizona Teacher of the Year Award and various other prizes. The event is made possible through sponsorships by businesses and community members.

Superintendent Risha VanderWey invites the public to nominate any outstanding teachers in Coconino County. Nomination forms can be found on the Superintendent’s website at www.coconino.az.gov/celebrate. Nominations must be received by Nov. 6 at 5 p.m.

For more information contact the School Superintendent’s Office at 928-679-8070.

Paving on Interstate 40 westbound ramps at A-1 Mountain traffic this Wednesday and Friday

FLAGSTAFF – The Arizona Department of Transportation is scheduled to pave at the westbound ramps at A-1 Mountain traffic interchange as part of the improvement project on Interstate 40 from Parks to Riordan.

ADOT advises drivers to allow extra travel time while work occurs on the westbound ramps at A-1 Mountain traffic interchange (Exit 190) as follows:

· Wednesday, Sept. 27, from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m.
· Friday, Sept. 29, from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Motorists can use the interchanges at Bellemont (milepost 185) and Flagstaff Ranch Road (milepost 192) for alternative travel. Signs will be in place to assist with detour routes in the area.

For more information about this project, visit azdot.gov/I40Paving.

Drivers should use caution and watch for construction personnel and equipment.

2017 Sustainable Building and Water Conservation Tour

FLAGSTAFF – The Coconino County Sustainable Building Program is hosting the annual Sustainable Building and Water Conservation Tour in partnership with the City of Flagstaff Sustainability and Water Conservation Programs, Willow Bend Environmental Education Center and the Coconino Plateau Watershed Partnership. The event will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, September 30 starting at the Willow Bend Environmental Education Center, 703 E. Sawmill Rd. Flagstaff.

The tour will offer perspectives from homeowners, builders, and installers about costs, processes, and the economic and environmental benefits of building sustainably. This tour is a part of the Flagstaff Festival of Science and the American Solar Energy Society’s National Tour.

Six of the buildings included on the tour will demonstrate water conservation methods such as rainwater harvesting for irrigation and potable use, greywater reuse, low-flow fixtures and xeriscaping. A tour of a tiny house on wheels will also be on-site.

The self-guided tour is free, with a suggested donation of $5 to support Willow Bend’s environmental education programs in local schools. Tour packets will be available at Willow Bend the day of the tour.

The tour is made possible through the following partners’ contributions: AP Sawmill & Lumber Products, Coconino Community College, Ezra Builders, Flagstaff Skylights, Loven Contracting, PWMA, Solar Design and Construction, and SolarTerra Design.

For more information visit www.coconino.az.gov/sustainablebuilding or contact (928) 679-8882.

Low-cost Rabies Vaccination Clinic

FLAGSTAFF – The Coconino County Public Health Services District (CCPHSD) is sponsoring a low-cost Rabies Vaccination Clinic from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, September 23 at the Coconino Humane Association, 3501 E. Butler Ave.

Rabies vaccinations will be $10 (dogs and cats). Fees for other vaccinations will vary and will be cash or check only. The Kaibab Veterinary Clinic will provide services.

CCPHSD Animal Management will also be offering the opportunity to license your canine companion for $12 altered and $25 unaltered. Spay/neuter vouchers ($30 value) will also be available for canine owners current with rabies vaccinations and licensing.

Arizona State law requires all dogs to be properly vaccinated and licensed. The CCPHSD strongly recommends that cats be vaccinated against rabies.

Rabies is an infectious disease that affects the nervous system, including the brain and spinal cord of animals and humans. It is caused by a virus present in the saliva of infected animals and is transmitted to humans through contact with the live virus.

For more information, call the CCPHSD Animal Management Program at 928-679-8756 or visit www.coconino.az.gov/health.

Capacity Development and Operator Certification Workshop

Current certified operators can earn professional development hours (PDHs) at our upcoming FREE workshop, featuring three training tracks: Operator Training, Public Water System Management Training and ADEQ Drinking Water Rule Review.

Dates
Oct. 17 – 18, 2017

Location
Little America
2515 E Butler Ave.
Flagstaff, AZ 86004

Details

Operator Tracks:
ADEQ Rule Review Sessions – Essential for both operators and owners or managers of PWS. Covers important drinking water rules and regulations applicable to all Arizona PWS. ADEQ staff will discuss reporting requirements; revised total coliform rule; NEW- Wastewater topics; stage 2 disinfection byproducts; common drinking water reporting mistakes and more.

Operator Training – Designed for current water or wastewater operators or those planning to become certified operators. Current operators earn Professional Development Hours (PDHs) toward certificate renewals. Topics include: water sources and treatment options; microbiology and water chemistry; well construction; operator math and more.

Manager/Owner Track:
Public Water System Management Training – Designed for owners of public water systems, board members of water-related organizations or municipalities, and superintendents and managers of public water systems. Topics include: emergency planning for water utilities; hazard analysis and risk mitigation; emergency response; water audit/water loss/leak detection; energy management; emerging technologies for small water systems; metering and remote sensing; and more.

Participants are responsible for their own lunch, travel and lodging.

View Agenda PDF
Register at this web site
Questions? Contact Mel Rose, 602-771-4695

Northern AZ prairie dog burrows dusted to combat plague near Williams, Flagstaff

FLAGSTAFF — The Arizona Game and Fish Department, together with the Kaibab National Forest Williams Ranger District, recently applied insecticidal dust Williams and Flagstaff-area Gunnison prairie dog holes for fleas.

Last month fleas tested near the Red Lake area north of Williams tested positive for plague, a potentially fatal disease that could eradicate prairie dog colonies and other infected animals. Plague-infected fleas were also recently found at an AZGFD research plot at Garland Prairie near Flagstaff.

“Unfortunately, it has been a very busy year for plague,” said Holly Hicks, a small mammals biologist with AZGFD. “An infestation can prove detrimental for prairie dog populations because they are highly communal animals, and the disease spreads easily in a colony. That is why it is important for us to identify an infected colony and dust it with insecticide to reduce the risk of infection to other animals and people.”

Crews recently dusted prairie dog holes across 664 acres near Red Lake about 10 miles north of Williams.

On September 3, an AZGFD biologist found a deceased prairie dog, which tested positive for plague near Garland Prairie. To prevent the spread, an additional 800 acres were dusted, including around plots currently being used for sylvatic plague vaccine research.

The disease is carried by fleas which spread the disease through host animals. While prairie dogs are host to fleas, the fleas can remain in the burrow after their host dies and attach themselves to the next host that comes along, which may or may not be another prairie dog.

Badgers, coyotes and foxes are also host to fleas and are more likely to cause a widespread outbreak of the disease because they travel further distances.

Those in areas where plague and/or rodents are known to be present are urged to take the following precautions to reduce their risk of exposure:

  • Do not handle sick or dead animals.
  • Prevent pets from roaming loose. Pets can pick up the infected fleas. De-flea pets routinely. Contact your veterinarian for specific recommendations.
  • Avoid rodent burrows and fleas.
  • Use insect repellents when visiting or working in areas where plague might be active or rodents might be present (campers, hikers, woodcutters and hunters).
  • Wear rubber gloves and other protection when cleaning and skinning wild animals.
  • Do not camp near rodent burrows and avoid sleeping directly on the ground.
  • In case of illness see your physician immediately as treatment with antibiotics is very effective.

More information is available at https://www.cdc.gov/plague/.