Route 66 license plate named tops in the nation

PHOENIX – “Flagstaff, Arizona, don’t forget Winona… Kingman…” Arizona figures prominently in the lyrics to the iconic pop song celebrating the highway known as the “Mother Road.” Now Arizona gets even more attention because the new Route 66 specialty license plate has been named the Best New License Plate in the U.S.

The honor, which will be formally recognized at a 1:30 p.m. ceremony Thursday, May 25, at the northwest corner of Wesley Bolin Memorial Plaza in Phoenix, comes from the Automobile License Plate Collectors Association (ALPCA).

ALPCA has given the award since 1970. ALPCA members worldwide vote based on the overall attractiveness of the plate design and its legibility as a tool for public safety and law enforcement. This is the third time for Arizona to win this award. The general issue plate introduced in 1996 and the Centennial plate introduced in 2011 also received Best Plate Awards.

ALPCA’s President Cyndi McCabe stated, “I’m delighted to announce that the state of Arizona is this year’s recipient of ALPCA’s Best Plate Award for their historic Route 66 specialty license plate. The plate’s visually appealing retro design particularly resonated with our members for its tribute to the legendary Mother Road.”

The Route 66 plate was introduced in late 2016 and has been a strong seller among specialty plates. As of the end of April, more than 3,000 had been sold, and more than $51,000 had been raised to support preservation efforts for the highway that crosses iconic northern Arizona landscapes and historic communities.

Arizona Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Division Director Eric Jorgensen said, “Route 66 carried more than cars, it carried peoples’ lives and millions of their stories. Even though its use as a major highway ended long ago, its ability to be an inspiration endures. We’re honored to be part of the effort to preserve this historic roadway by offering this award-winning plate.”

June 2017 Operator Certification & Capacity Development Training & Events

Navigating Water Infrastructure Funding Programs Workshop for Small Water Systems
Thursday, June 1, 2017, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. MST
Industrial Commission of Arizona
800 W. Washington Street
Phoenix, AZ 85007
AGENDA & REGISTRATION >

ADEQ Free Training: Essentials of Surface Water Treatment   
Thursday – Friday, June 1 – 2
Quartzsite Community Center
295 Chandler Street
Quartzsite, AZ 85346
AGENDA & REGISTRATION >

ADEQ Free Training: Essentials of Surface Water Treatment
Monday – Tuesday, June 5 – 6
Arizona Game & Fish
3500 S. Lake Mary Road
Flagstaff, AZ 86005
AGENDA & REGISTRATION >

ADEQ Free Operator Training
Wednesday, June 7, 8 a.m. – 4:50 p.m. MST
ADEQ Phoenix Office — Room 3175 A/B
1110 W. Washington St.
Phoenix, AZ 85007
AGENDA & REGISTRATION >

Introduction to Cyber Security: Workshop and Response Exercises
Thursday, June 8, 8:30 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. MST
City of Glendale
7070 W. Northern Ave.
Glendale, AZ 85303
Contact: Erin Cabral at 508-833-6600 or ecabral@horsleywitten.com
AGENDA & REGISTRATION >

PDHs
Current certified operators earn professional development hours (PDHs) at training events. View all ADEQ training opportunities at azdeq.gov/OperatorCertification.

Register Today — limited seating!

Questions?
Contact 602-771-4511 or 602-771-4695
Email >

No highway construction closures during Memorial Day weekend

PHOENIX – During the Memorial Day weekend, state and local agencies are focusing on keeping motorists safe and placing equipment and resources along heavily traveled highways to help move traffic should incidents occur.

The Arizona Department of Transportation and its contractors won’t schedule construction closures along state highways from Friday through late Monday evening. Drivers are urged to use caution over the holiday weekend in existing work zones and in three “holiday travel corridors” that will receive extra enforcement and resources to minimize travel delays.

As they have during recent major holiday weekends, ADOT and the Arizona Department of Public Safety are emphasizing safety in three high-traffic zones: Interstate 17 between north Phoenix and Flagstaff, Interstate 10 between Phoenix and Tucson and State Route 87 between Mesa and Payson. Along those routes, ADOT crews will strategically stage equipment, such as loaders and utility trucks, minimizing travel delays with faster response times to crashes and stalled vehicles. Overhead signs will update travelers on traffic conditions and safety reminders.

DPS will focus on preventing three leading causes of traffic deaths: speeding, impaired driving and lack of seat-belt use. Many of ADOT’s overhead signs throughout the state will display a message aimed at discouraging speeding. The Governor’s Office of Highway Safety is working with state troopers, police officers and deputy sheriffs on a holiday DUI enforcement campaign. Last year in Arizona, seven people died in seven fatal traffic collisions during the holiday weekend. Two of the crashes were alcohol-related.

No closures are scheduled during the holiday weekend, but travelers should be aware that existing work-zone restrictions with lane reductions will remain in place. This includes a 30-mile stretch of I-40 east of Kingman, I-40 near Twin Arrows and I-10 near Bowie.

Because unexpected delays can occur due to crashes and stalled vehicles, drivers are encouraged to:

Pack extra drinking water and snacks.
Avoid the busiest travel times, if possible.
Get plenty of rest before driving.
Check vehicles, including tire pressure, belts and fluid levels.

Summer food safety tips

FLAGSTAFF – Summer is the time for picnics and cookouts but these outdoor activities can present food safety challenges. Bacteria in food multiply faster at temperatures between 41°F and 140°F, so following food safety guidelines during the warm summer months is especially important.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that each year roughly 1 in 6 Americans (or 48 million people) gets sick, 128,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die of foodborne diseases. To avoid the risk of foodborne illnesses, the Coconino County Public Health Services District (CCPHSD) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) encourage consumers to take appropriate precautions in handling, preparing and cooking foods during the summer months and throughout the year.

Clean: Wash Hands and Surfaces Often.
Unwashed hands are a prime cause of foodborne illness. Wash hands with warm, soapy water before handling food and especially after handling raw meat, using the bathroom, changing diapers and handling pets. When in an outdoor setting with no running water, use a water jug, some soap, and paper towels. Consider carrying moist disposable towelettes or use hand sanitizer for cleaning your hands.

Separate – Don’t Cross-Contaminate.
Cross-contamination during preparation, grilling and serving food is a prime cause of foodborne illness. When packing the cooler chest for an outing, wrap raw meats securely and avoid raw meat juices from contact with ready-to-eat food by storing raw meat below these foods. Wash plates, utensils and cutting boards that held the raw meat or poultry before using again for cooked food.

Cook: Cook to Safe Temperatures.
Foods are properly cooked when they are heated for a long enough time and at a high enough temperature to kill the harmful bacteria that cause foodborne illness. Take a food thermometer along. Meat and poultry cooked on a grill often browns very fast on the outside, so be sure that meats are cooked thoroughly. Check them with a food thermometer.

Cook to proper temperatures and maintain the proper temperature for at least 15 seconds. Proper cooking temperatures of some foods include:

Fish steaks and beef steaks …………….…..1450F (or higher)
Ground meat …………………………………1600F (or higher)
Poultry …………………………………..….. 1650F (or higher)

Chill: Refrigerate Promptly.
Holding food at an unsafe temperature is a prime cause of foodborne illness. Keep cold food cold at 410F or less.

Keep perishable food cold like luncheon meats, cooked meats, chicken, and potato or pasta salads by storing in an insulated cooler packed with ample ice (at least several inches deep), ice packs, or containers of frozen water. Replenish ice frequently throughout the day.
Consider packing canned beverages in one cooler and perishable food in another cooler because the beverage cooler will probably be opened frequently.

Remember – when in doubt, throw it out.
Food left out of refrigeration for more than two hours may not be safe to eat. Above 90 °F, food should not be left out over one hour. Play it safe; put leftover perishables back on ice once you finish eating so they do not spoil or become unsafe to eat.

Following these guidelines can help to make summer outings more enjoyable for all. For information about food safety and additional cooking temperatures, visit http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm094562.htm or call the Coconino County Public Health Services District at 928.679.8750 or toll-free at 1.877.679.7272.

NOAA issues RED FLAG warning

Wind speed are expected to increase becoming breezy tonight and high tomorrow across northern Arizona. The critical fire condition could continue Friday.

NOAA has issued a Red Flag warning for Thursday beginning at 11 a.m. running through 8 p.m. in northern Arizona. Today winds will be from the south 16 to 21-mph decreasing to 9 to 14-mph after midnight. Sustained west winds in excess of 30-mph with gusts over 45 are expected late morning through the evening hours Thursday.

Increased wind may combine with low humidity to produce areas of critical fire weather conditions across north central and eastern Arizona Thursday afternoon. The high winds will make travel of high profile vehicles difficult. It is recommended that you slow down and drive with care if you are traveling. Some areas of blowing dust may reduce visibility.

With the increased danger of forest fire, camp fires are not recommended. Use gas stoves if you intend to camp around Williams or Flagstaff.

Coconino County Offices closed May 29 in honor of Memorial Day

FLAGSTAFF — All Coconino County administrative offices will be closed Monday, May 29, 2017 in honor of Memorial Day.

While the administrative offices at the Sheriff’s Office will be closed, Dispatch, Patrol and Detention will be open. Records will be open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Please dial 9-1-1 for emergencies. For non-emergencies, dial 928-774-4523 to connect with the non-emergency Dispatch number or to leave a message for one of the administrative offices.

Coconino County’s parks and natural areas will remain open, but administrative offices at Fort Tuthill County Park will be closed and no staff or services will be available. Drinking fountains and hose spigots have been turned off at all parks, but bathrooms are still available at Raymond County Park, Peaks View County Park, and Sawmill County Park. Water and bathrooms are available at Louise Yellowman County Park, located in Tuba City.

Coconino County Public Health Services District (CCPHSD) Animal Management will have an officer available from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Contact the CCPHSD Animal Management office at 928-679-8756 and leave a message and an officer will respond. Call 9-1-1 for emergencies.

Page hosts 2nd Annual Regional Economic Outlook Conference

PAGE — Coconino County District 5 Supervisor Lena Fowler and the Page Chamber of Commerce hosted the 2nd annual Regional Economic Development Outlook Conference. The theme of this year’s conference was “Inform, Engage, Act.”

Over 100 participants from across northern Arizona listened to presentations by Supervisor Fowler, Page Mayor Bill Diak, Dr. Wade Rousse from Northern Arizona University (NAU) and others. John Stigmon of the Economic Collaborative of Northern Arizona (ECONA) moderated the day-long event and presented.

“This conference was another tremendous success thanks to the hard work and dedication of so many people,” said Supervisor Fowler. “As people who care about our sense of place and where we come from, we must continue to think of ways we can keep families together and people living here. The people at this conference came up with so many great ideas so that we can continue to work for a prosperous future.”

An education panel with representatives from NAU, Coconino County Community College, Dine College and Navajo Technical Institute discussed the formation of the Page Higher Education Center. Entrepreneurs and business owners in the region also shared the challenges and opportunities of running a small business.

Participants of the conference were encouraged to share information, generate ideas and strategies for future economic development for northern Arizona and the Page region. Stakeholders were challenged to come up with a vision with the impending closure of Navajo Generating Station.

The humble MVD Sold Notice may keep you out of court

PHOENIX – Selling your car to the guy down the street, online or to a family member is a concept that probably goes back as far as Henry Ford himself. But the Arizona Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Division reminds you that reporting a private sale makes good sense and may keep you out of court.

Filling out a Sold Notice is simple and there is no fee. It should be completed within 10 calendar days of selling your vehicle and it can be done anytime online at ServiceArizona.com.

“A Sold Notice protects consumers,” said MVD Stakeholder Relations Manager Jennifer Bowser-Richards. “If the vehicle is sold and is later in a crash or used in a crime, or if it’s simply abandoned, the MVD will have a record of the sale. That means a former owner won’t be responsible for abandoned vehicle fees, or worse called into court to explain why the vehicle was used in a crime or crash they had nothing do to with.”

MVD also keeps an eye out for unscrupulous unlicensed or licensed dealers that may attempt to sell a vehicle as though they were actually a private seller. When a vehicle is sold by a private owner to a dealer, a Sold Notice will alert MVD if that dealer attempts to re-sell the vehicle privately and ADOT Enforcement will initiate an investigation.

For more information about Sold Notices, visit azdot.gov/mvd.

ADEQ fish advisory for Largemouth Bass

PHOENIX – The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, in association with the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), has issued a fish consumption advisory for largemouth bass caught from Willow Springs Lake in Coconino County that recommends healthy consumption amounts. This advisory is based on recent analysis of Willow Springs Lake largemouth bass fish tissue sample data that showed elevated levels of mercury.

ADEQ recommends that adults limit consumption of largemouth bass to 2.5 ounces (uncooked weight) per week and children 12 years of age and younger limit consumption to two ounces per month (uncooked weight).

Willow Springs Lake is home to a variety of fish and during the spring and summer, the AGFD stocks the lake with rainbow trout that can be eaten in unlimited amounts.

Fishing, bird watching, swimming and other recreational activities at Willow Springs Lake are not affected by this advisory and are encouraged for enjoying the great outdoors. Generally, any contaminant levels found in water are several folds lower than in fish tissue.

Fish are an excellent source of protein and can be an important part of a healthy, diverse diet as they are low in saturated fat. The American Heart Association recommends people eat at least two fish or seafood meals every week. The public health recommendations in this advisory are based on frequent and long-term consumption of fish, not infrequent or occasional fish meals.

RESOURCES:

Click to learn more about ADEQ Fish Consumption Advisories
Click to view the ADEQ Fish Consumption Advisory Fact Sheet (PDF)

ADEQ welcomes comments on the proposed infrastructure SIP revision for the PM10 National Ambient Air Quality Standards

PHOENIX – The Air Quality Division of the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) welcomes comments on the proposed infrastructure State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision for the PM10 National Ambient Air Quality Standards. The SIP revision demonstrates that the State of Arizona has the necessary resources to implement, maintain, and enforce the PM10 air quality standards.

View Public Notice/Related Documents >

Public Comment Period:
May 22, 2017 to June 21, 2017

Public Hearing:
Wednesday, June 21, 2017 at 1:00 p.m.
1110 W. Washington St., Rm. 3100B
Phoenix, AZ 85007

Comments may be submitted as follows:
Email: Send Email >
Fax: 602-771-2299
Mail: (Must be postmarked by June 21, 2017)

ADEQ
Catherine Lucke-McDowell
Air Quality Division, Air Quality Improvement Planning Section
1110 W. Washington St.
Phoenix, AZ  85007