Arizona Department of Transportation and local agencies plan to improve State Route 89A corridor

PRESCOTT – The Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) and partnering agencies including the Central Yavapai Metropolitan Planning Organization and Yavapai County are conducting a transportation planning study along State Route 89A from State Route 89 to east of Robert Road. The purpose of the study is to identify potential transportation improvements for the next 20 years as housing and commercial developments are anticipated to increase traffic volumes in the area.

ADOT will host a public meeting regarding the study on Tuesday, December 12, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Town of Prescott Valley Public Library located at 7401 E. Civic Circle, Prescott Valley, Arizona, 86314. A brief presentation will start at 6:15 p.m. followed by an open-house setting that will allow participants to speak directly with ADOT representatives. The public is encouraged to attend and provide comments.

Learn more about the study at:www.azdot.gov/SR89RobertRoadStudy . If you are unable to attend the meeting but would like to comment, you can do so before Dec. 31 in the following ways:

By telephone: 855.712.8530
By email:Projects@azdot.gov
In writing: State Route 89A Study, 206 S. 17th Avenue, MD310B, Phoenix, AZ 85007

Pursuant to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), ADOT does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, sex or disability. Persons who require a reasonable accommodation based on language or disability should contact Michele Beggs at 928.681.6054 or MBeggs@azdot.gov. Requests should be made as early as possible to ensure the State has an opportunity to address the accommodation.

Possible poaching case reported by Prescott citizens

PRESCOTT VALLEY – A large mule deer buck familiar to Prescott-area residents was illegally taken this week, and thanks to the quick actions of several local residents, investigators from the Arizona Game and Fish Department are hard at work on the case. Wildlife officers responded immediately when the first reports came in Tuesday, August 29 and are continuing to gather evidence.

“We’re very grateful to everyone who called us with information regarding this case,” said Darren Tucker, field supervisor for AZGFD. “We take citizen reports very seriously and this time, it was the evidence they provided that may solve the case.”

The poached buck was one of a small band that has lived in and around the Prescott area for several years. AZGFD investigators will be canvassing residents near the kill site to gain additional evidence. Anyone with information is encouraged to call the department’s Operation Game Thief hotline at (800) 352-0700, or visit www.azgfd.gov/thief, and refer to case #17-0003179. Callers may remain anonymous upon request.

AZGFD pays cash rewards to individuals whose reports of wildlife crimes lead to a conviction. Under law, callers can remain anonymous and their confidentiality is protected. Money for rewards comes from poaching fines, civil restitution by violators who commit wildlife crimes and donations.

“As we head into Labor Day weekend, we ask everyone visiting the forest to keep their eyes and ears open and report potential violations,” Tucker said. “Citizen reports often help us catch criminals and make cases that might otherwise have gone unknown or unsolved.”

Bradshaw Ranger District reports some success in Goodwin Fire

PRESCOTT – The 25,714 acre Goodwin Fire centered 14 miles south of Prescott is 44% contained as of today. The fire started June 24 at about 4 P.M. and the cause of the fire is under investigation. Some evacuations have been lifted.

Fire crews constructed a large amount of fireline yesterday in a critical part of the fire on top of Big Bug Mesa. After reviewing the day’s accomplishment, Operations Section Chief, Todd Abel, said “We are setup for success”.

Bulldozers will continue to create contingency firelines north of the fire, today, in order to protect Dewey in the event the fire moves across existing firelines.

Crews will continue mopping up where the fire burned along the SR69 side of the fire. Firefighters will also start rehabilitating firelines and removing equipment in areas where the fire has been contained. Crews will be patrolling these areas of the fire and will remain in place to protect Breezy Pine Canyon and Pine Flat.

Slightly stronger winds from the southwest are expected today. The fire continues to move very slowly into sparse vegetation located in an old fire scar. The fire only grew by 472 acres yesterday.

As of 10 a.m. this morning, evacuation orders were lifted for Blue Hills and Upper Blue Hills where power has been restored. The evacuation of Dewey/Humboldt all areas west of SR 69 south to mile post 280 has also been lifted, but west Poland Junction remains under evacuation. The Blue Hills/Upper Blue Hills area has fire suppression sprinklers that were installed by firefighters in various portions of the community. Please keep these areas clear and allow fire officials access to do their work.

SR 69 – west side from Grapevine Road north to Milepost 280, Poland Junction- west side, Pine Flat, Breezy Pines, Walker, Potato Patch, Mount Union, Mountain Pine Acres still remains under mandatory evacuation.

Although some evacuations have been lifted and roads reopened, property owners are urged to remain vigilant and monitor fire news. There is still active fire behavior, particularly in the northern portion of the fire, and conditions can change easily if impacted by high wind events. For additional information regarding evacuations and pre-evacuations please call the Yavapai County Emergency Operation Center at (928) 442-5103, 7am – 7pm.

Shoulder widening project on State Route 89A in Prescott Valley starts this week

PRESCOTT – The Arizona Department of Transportation will begin work on a nine-mile shoulder widening project this week on State Route 89A between Coyote Springs Road and Legend Hills Drive (mileposts 324 to 332) in Prescott Valley.

Drivers are encouraged to be alert for increased construction activity throughout the work zone and adhere to reduced speeds as work begins.

Work hours initially for this project are Monday through Thursday between 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. through the end of the month and then construction will be a 24-hour operation towards the beginning of May.

This $2.4 million project consists of widened shoulders, resurfacing, installing new signage, drainage improvements, new pavement markings and other miscellaneous work.

Drivers should proceed through the work zone with caution, slow down and watch for construction personnel and equipment.

Plan for restrictions on SR 69 in Prescott Valley starting on Nov. 7

PRESCOTT VALLEY — Drivers traveling on State Route 69 next week should allow extra travel time for striping work. Lane striping is scheduled daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 7, through Wednesday, Nov. 9, from State Route 169 to Mendecino Drive in Prescott Valley. Alternating lane restrictions are expected during work hours.

Crews will restripe a six-mile segment of newly repaved roadway in preparation of the winter months. The final layer of rubberized asphalt will be completed when warmer temperatures return in the spring of 2017.

Drivers should proceed through the work zone with caution, slow down and watch for construction equipment and personnel.

ADOT works to inform the public about planned highway restrictions, but it’s possible that unscheduled closures or restrictions might occur because of weather or other factors. For the latest highway conditions around the state, visit the ADOT Traveler Information Center at www.az511.gov or call 511, except while driving.

Overnight paving work starts Sunday night on SR 69 between SR 169 and Mendecino Drive in Prescott Valley

PRESCOTT VALLEY — The Arizona Department of Transportation will begin paving work on State Route 69 in Prescott Valley between State Route 169 and Mendecino Drive (mileposts 281 to 287) this Sunday (Aug. 7). Crews will begin at the State Route 169 and State Route 69 intersection and work northbound for the first week.

Work hours are Sunday through Thursday nights between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m. Drivers can expect a single lane restriction through the work zone during work hours. Minimal delays are expected.

This $3.8 million project consists of new asphalt, guardrail replacements, new curbs and gutters, sidewalks, sidewalks ramps, new striping and other miscellaneous work.

ADOT works to inform the public about planned highway restrictions, but there is a possibility that unscheduled closures or restrictions may occur. Weather can also affect a project schedule. To stay up-to-date with the latest highway conditions around the state, visit the ADOT Traveler Information Center at www.az511.gov or call 5-1-1.

New pavement project scheduled on SR 69 between SR 169 and Mendecino Drive in Prescott Valley

PRESCOTT VALLEY — State Route 69 in Prescott Valley between State Route 169 and Mendecino Drive (mileposts 281 to 287) will be an active work zone at night starting Sunday (July 31).

This $3.8 million project consists of new asphalt, guardrail replacements, new curbs and gutters, sidewalks, sidewalks ramps, new striping and other miscellaneous work.

Work hours are Sunday through Thursday nights between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m. each day. Minimal delays are expected this coming week as crews will be working on sidewalk and other concrete structures at the intersections.

ADOT works to inform the public about planned highway restrictions, but there is a possibility that unscheduled closures or restrictions may occur. Weather can also affect a project schedule. To stay up-to-date with the latest highway conditions around the state, visit the ADOT Traveler Information Center at az511.gov or call 511.

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation to hold Banquet in Prescott

Arizona Game & Fish photo

Arizona Game & Fish photo

PRESCOTT VALLEY— The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation will hold their Prescott Big Game Banquet on July 25th. The doors will open at the Prescott Valley Event Center, 3201 N Main St, Prescott Valley, AZ 86314. For tickets and information call 928-710-8988. You can purchase tickets online here.

The funds from the banquet and the other projects of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation benefit habitat preservation for elk and deer. The group activities include purchasing land, creating and preserving safe water tanks and other activities to ensure a safe habitat for the animals across North America.

The dinner is open to anyone interested in maintaining a healthy big game population.

PUBLIC NOTICE: Town of Prescott Valley AZPDES permit modification

PROPOSED ARIZONA POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM (AZPDES) PERMIT MODIFICATION

Pursuant to the Clean Water Act and in accordance with Arizona Administrative Code (A.A.C.) R18-9-A907, the Director of the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) proposes to issue an Arizona Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (AZPDES) Permit to discharge pollutants to Waters of the United States to the following applicant, subject to certain effluent limitations and special conditions:

Public Notice No. 15-62                                   Published on June 7, 2015
Published in the Prescott Daily Courier

AZPDES Permit No. AZ0025381
Town of Prescott Valley
7501 E. Civic Circle Drive
Prescott Valley, Arizona 86314
Continue reading “PUBLIC NOTICE: Town of Prescott Valley AZPDES permit modification” »

Arizona Survivalist/Prepper Expo well worth the visit

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The Arizona Survivalist Prepper Expo at Tim’s Toyota Center. – Photo courtesy of Arizona Survivalist Prepper Expo.

600px-aspe-logo-1PRESCOTT VALLEY – The word “survival” generally evokes images of toothless rednecks sitting in a hole atop cases of ammo clinging to their AR-15 assault rifle chewing on canned beef jerky while awaiting government troops to arrive. That is if you believe the image projected by the media and Southern Enriched-by-taxpayer-dollar Law Center.

While the scenario of government troops played out at the Bundy Ranch, recently, survival does not necessarily mean an encounter with government troops. We do not even have to use our imaginations to come up with alternate scenarios. The people affected by Katrina thought the government would take care of them. The people of Bellemont probably did not wake up expecting a tornado to rip through their town. The people of Oak Creek were probably not expecting a camper—or group of campers—to carelessly light a camp fire when we have had the driest season in recent memory. The list goes on. Survival preparedness is useful for any natural or man-made disaster or accidents in the home requiring medical attention.

On a more mundane level, many of these same products can be used for camping and fishing trips. Family picnics or gatherings in the home. Or just general everyday use, such as water filters and medical supplies.

Northern Arizona Gazette visited the Arizona Survivalist/Prepper Expo (Facebook) at Tim’s Toyota Center in Prescott Valley on the 31st. After being passed through the efficient security personnel at Tim’s (who weren’t alerted to my coming), I got to get a look inside. The exposition run by Lance and his wife Lisa and a minimal staff feature not only the vendors, but guest speakers as well. Their mission is to provide vendors and information to assist citizens of Arizona in preparing for natural or man-made survival situations.

The booths at the exposition were not all about survival. A couple of politicians had booths as well as Arizona organizations. The Arizona Citizens Defense League which fights for Second Amendment rights had a table to provide information and sign up new members. The Prescott Valley chapter of the Young Marines also had a booth to sell excess supplies and raffle tickets for an M-14. Their efforts benefit their organization as well as Wounded Warriors and Toys-For-Tots. As an aside, one of the adult supervisors of the group stressed that the Young Marines is not a recruiting effort. It is an educational effort that teaches team work and discipline among other useful skills.

The recent Fukushima Daiichi disaster in Japan highlights the danger of living near a nuclear power plant. Many speculate not only that the dangers of the initial disaster were minimized in the media, but that the effects of the release of nuclear matter by the disaster could be felt for years to come. Owner Mike Peters, employee Allison Truong and Customer Liaison Ezra Child were on hand to display the Ultimate Bunker which can be built with protection against any such disaster in the United States. Ezra explained that the same capability can be used for people living in a forested area. Northern Arizona recently experienced the Slide Rock Fire. The air filtering system can be used to eliminate smoke in the bunkers.

The Ultimate Bunker can be used as a home as much as a bunker. Some have built homes underground simply because the temperature is a constant all year. Hydroponics or aquaponics systems may also be added.

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Tim Ralston of Gear Up in Scottsdale. Featured on National Geographic Doomsday Preppers. – Photo courtesy of Arizona Survivalist Prepper Expo.

Tim Ralston of Gear Up has been featured on National Geographic Doomsday Preppers. We learned about him through an interview on Coast-to-Coast AM with George Noory. He was featuring his Crovel tool. Having seen one up close I can say that it is pretty impressive. Tonight I even saw one being used on the National Geographic show Diggers. They are solid tools built right here in Arizona. I would be glad to take a review model and put it through the paces here in the mountains of northern Arizona. Unfortunately time constraints did not permit an interview, but Tim is really a personable man and sat talking with people on a variety of topics. His counterpart at the booth was just as enjoyable to speak with.

There is also a local source of non-GMO seed in Chino Valley called Terroir Seed. As I understood it, they do not have a store, but you can order seed through their web site.

Another item which interested me was battlefield acupuncture. Dr. Michael Austin was at the expo from Tuscon to introduce the technique to northern Arizona. A variety of acupuncture techniques have been used by military physicians since 2001 to combat pain without drugs. The particular technique he is interested in teaching utilizes small needles in the ear which he considers safer than the traditional method with large needles in various parts of the body.

The bottom line is that if you want to see the latest in just about every survival possibility in one location, these expositions are well worth the $10 admission for the entire event. It is as much a learning experience as a buying one.