Young hunters wanted for Pintail Slough Junior Waterfowl Camp

KINGMAN — Young hunters who want to learn all about waterfowl hunting are invited to attend the annual Pintail Slough Junior Waterfowl Camp, sponsored by the Arizona Game and Fish Department.

The camp will take place January 6-7 (hunters check in January 5) at Havasu National Wildlife Refuge. The deadline to register is December 22. The event is limited to 18 hunters between ages 12 and 17 (each must be accompanied by an adult). No prior experience is necessary.

All young hunters will learn how to identify, hunt and clean waterfowl before putting those skills to use in the Pintail Slough duck blinds.

“If you aren’t getting out, you’re missing out,” said AJ Lander, wildlife manager. “This is just a great opportunity for parents to get outside with their kids and enjoy the outdoors.”

To request an application, contact Elise Theel at etheel@azgfd.gov, or call the department’s regional office in Kingman at (928) 692-7700. A refundable $40 registration fee is required. All participants will be chosen through a random draw and will be notified by e-mail or telephone.

Information sought in deer poaching case near Bagdad

KINGMAN – The Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD) is seeking information about a recent poaching of a deer near Bagdad, Arizona.

The doe was shot in the neck on or about October 28 and left to waste near Hardy Schell, a stock tank northwest of Windy Ridge in Game Management Unit 18B. AZGFD is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to an arrest in this case.

“Evidence was collected at the scene, but help from the public will play a critical role in finding those responsible,” AZGFD Wildlife Manager AJ Lander said. “This is not the act of a hunter. Poaching is a crime. It is stealing wildlife from the citizens of Arizona. It is important for anyone with information to come forward and help Game and Fish bring those responsible to justice.”

An investigation is ongoing, and wildlife officers are seeking information about a 1980’s model two-tone blue and grey Ford Bronco. Two male individuals are believed to be involved.

One man was described as being in his 60s, with black curly hair and an overweight build. This individual was seen wearing black coveralls, similar to what a mechanic would wear, and is believed to be the driver of the Bronco. The other subject was also described as being in his 60s, with a slimmer build and was seen wearing blue jeans and an orange hunter hat.

Officers are asking anyone with information about the person or persons responsible for this crime to come forward.

Anyone with information about the case can call the department’s Operation Game Thief hotline toll-free at (800) 352-0700 and provide case number 17-004326 or use the online form at www.azgfd.gov/ogt. Callers’ identities will be kept confidential, and people can report anonymously if needed.

To learn more about Operation Game Thief, visit www.azgfd.gov/ogt.

AZGFD to participate in multi-agency OUI checkpoint on Colorado River

KINGMAN — The Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD) will participate in a multi-agency enforcement patrol this weekend on the Colorado River, pursuing those who are operating their boats and other watercraft while under the influence (OUI) of drugs or alcohol.

AZGFD, together with the Nevada Department of Wildlife and the National Park Service, will be enforcing Arizona’s OUI legal limit of a .08 blood-alcohol content.

Throughout the weekend, boaters may be required to pass through a checkpoint and be subject to a systematic safety inspection. Operators will be checked for any sign of impairment from alcohol or drugs, and to ensure the required safety equipment, such as proper life jackets and working fire extinguishers, are aboard.

“The responsibility for boating safety among watercraft users is critically important,” said Brandon Carley, law enforcement supervisor for the department’s regional office in Kingman. “The area is growing quickly, and we share these waterways with California and Nevada. It’s becoming very congested, which lends itself to more potential hazards.”

Carley advises boaters and watercraft users should review all regulations prior to launching. That includes having a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket for every person on board and making sure that anyone 12 and under is wearing one at all times. Boats also must be equipped with a fire extinguisher and a Type IV throwable personal flotation device (PFD).

For more information on boating in Arizona, or to sign up for a free safety course, visit www.azgfd.gov/boating.

Arizona begins installation of state’s first Safety Corridors

PHOENIX — This week, Arizona motorists will see new signage designating segments of some state highways as Safety Corridors. By the end of December, motorists may also notice an increased law enforcement presence in these Safety Corridors.

Safety Corridors are highway segments that have more crashes, injuries and deaths than would ordinarily be expected. Over the next two months, the Arizona Department of Transportation, Arizona Department of Public Safety and Governor’s Office of Highway Safety will implement four Safety Corridors in Arizona, aiming to reduce crashes, severe injuries and traffic fatalities.

“These segments were selected because they have higher-than-average instances of speeding, aggressive driving, impaired driving and lack of seat belt use,” said Brent Cain, director of ADOT’s Transportation Systems Management and Operations Division. “Those are the leading factors in traffic deaths, and decreasing their occurrence makes the roads safer for everyone.”

Motorists will see new signs signaling they are entering and leaving a Safety Corridor, as well as signs that alert drivers that there will be zero tolerance for violations in a corridor.

“There will be strict enforcement of driving laws with zero tolerance for violations,” said DPS Lt. Col. Daniel Lugo. “If drivers obey the speed limit and other laws, there will be fewer crashes.”

The Safety Corridors will launch in two phases, with each including an urban and rural segment. Sign installation in the first phase begins today, Monday, Dec. 12, and will be completed by Dec. 20. Work on the second phase is scheduled to begin and be completed in January 2017.

PHASE ONE

o Interstate 10 (urban): Four-miles from the I-17 Stack to SR 51/Loop 202 Red Mountain Mini-Stack (mileposts 143-147)
o Interstate 10 (rural): Twenty-three miles from Loop 202 Santan Freeway to State Route 187 (mileposts 162-185)

PHASE TWO

o US 60 (urban): Thirteen miles from Loop 101 Price Freeway to Loop 202 (mileposts 177-190)
o Interstate 40 (rural): Twenty-three miles from Kingman east to US 93 (mileposts 49-72)

A grant from the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety helped support establishing these Safety Corridors.

“The Safety Corridors will make traveling safer for everyone,” said Alberto Gutier, director of the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety. “If you already obey driving laws, you have nothing to worry about and can enjoy safer travel. If you speed, drive aggressively or break other driving laws, you will face the consequences of zero tolerance enforcement.”

Safety Corridor segments were selected by reviewing historic crash data related to driver behavior and input from law enforcement. This is a pilot program that will remain in place for at least one to two years. After that, the partner agencies will review their effectiveness and consider whether to add Safety Corridors.

ADEQ Awards $22,530 in Brownfields Grants to Jerry Ambrose Veterans Council, Kingman

PHOENIX — Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) officials announced today two Brownfields Grant awards totaling $22,530 to the Jerry Ambrose Veterans Council (JAVC) (http://www.javc.org/) to support redevelopment of the long-vacant, deteriorating Arnold Plaza located at 301-315 E. Oak Street in downtown Kingman. JAVC’s reuse plan for Arnold Plaza, called ‘Operation 6’, will establish and provide transitional housing, treatment, training and reintegration for homeless and at-risk military veterans and their families.

Grant funds will be used to perform a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) and asbestos and lead-based paint survey. The ESA and survey will address both the underlying land and physical improvements to the property by identifying potential or existing environmental contamination and the presence, type and amount of building materials that contain asbestos and lead-based paint, which require cleanup or abatement to protect public health and the environment.

Public forums set for 2017 pronghorn, elk hunt recommendations

pronghornPHOENIX — The Arizona Game and Fish Department will host four public forums to meet with constituents about developing the 2017 hunt recommendations for pronghorn, elk and population management seasons.

The department annually makes recommendations to the Arizona Game and Fish Commission regarding the management of game species for the annual hunting and trapping regulations, which establish the seasons, dates, bag limits, open areas and hunt permit-tag allocations, based on the framework of the hunt guidelines set by the commission every two years.

The meetings will be conducted from 6 to 8 p.m. at the following Game and Fish regional offices:

  • Wednesday, Oct. 19: Kingman, 5325 N. Stockton Hill Road.
  • Thursday, Oct. 20: Flagstaff, 3500 S. Lake Mary Road.
  • Wednesday, Oct. 26: Pinetop, 2878 E. White Mountain Blvd.
  • Thursday, Oct. 27: Mesa, 7200 E. University Drive.

Constituents who are interested in specific game management units within those regions will have the opportunity to discuss management direction. The proposed hunt recommendations will be outlined during a short presentation, which will be followed by an opportunity to submit comments regarding those recommendations. All comments will be reviewed by the department.

After the public forums have been completed, the final proposed draft hunt recommendations will be made available for public review at several regional open houses and posted on the department’s website at www.azgfd.gov/huntguidelines by Nov. 21, 2016.

Open houses will be conducted at the following Game and Fish regional offices:

  • 6 to 8 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 23: Flagstaff, 3500 S. Lake Mary Road.
  • 3 to 5 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 23: Yuma, 9140 E. 28th St.
  • 3 to 5 p.m., Monday, Nov. 28: Tucson, 555 N. Greasewood Road.
  • 3 to 5 p.m., Monday, Nov. 28: Pinetop, 2878 E. White Mountain Blvd.
  • 3 to 5 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 29: Kingman, 5325 N. Stockton Hill Road.
  • 4:30 to 7:30 p.m., TBD: Mesa, 7200 E. University Drive.

The final 2017 pronghorn and elk hunt recommendations will be presented to the commission for consideration during its Dec. 3 meeting in Phoenix.

AZGFD among agencies conducting OUI checkpoint on Colorado River

KINGMAN — The Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD) will participate in a multi-agency enforcement patrol this weekend on the Colorado River, pursuing those who are operating their boats and other watercraft while under the influence (OUI) of drugs or alcohol.

AZGFD, together with the Mohave County Sheriff’s Office and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will be on the lookout for boat and watercraft operators violating the law and who are found to be above Arizona’s OUI legal limit of a .08 blood-alcohol content.

Throughout the weekend, boaters may be required to pass through a checkpoint and be subject to a systematic safety inspection. Operators will be checked for any sign of impairment from alcohol or drugs, and to ensure the required safety equipment, such as proper life jackets and working fire extinguishers, are aboard.

“Our main goal is to ensure people are enjoying our waterways safely and responsibly, and to help avert the next needless accident on the water,” said Velma Holt, west sector supervisor for the department’s regional office in Kingman. “The responsibility for boating safety among watercraft users is critically important.

“Because we share the river with California and Nevada, the area is a major draw for people traveling from across the Southwest. This time of year, our waterways are very congested, which lends itself to the potential for additional hazards.”

Boaters and watercraft users should review all regulations prior to launching. That includes having a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket for every person on board and making sure that anyone 12 and under is wearing one. Boats also must be equipped with a fire extinguisher and a Type IV throwable personal flotation device (PFD).

Additional multi-agency OUI checkpoints will occur on the Colorado River and its reservoirs throughout the boating season.

Summer Wildlife Series continues with mountain lions

mountain-lionKINGMAN — The secretive, shy and elusive mountain lion will be the subject of a free, one-hour presentation July 8 at the Kingman Mohave County Library, 3269 N. Burbank St., in Kingman.

This will be the third installment of the popular Summer Wildlife Series, hosted by the Arizona Game and Fish Department’s regional office in Kingman. The main portion of the library will be open to accommodate a larger crowd.

Jeff Pebworth, terrestrial wildlife program manager, will discuss biology, myths, perceptions and management of the predator, whose population in Arizona is robust and healthy, even expanding in some areas. He also will explain why one of the biggest dangers associated with mountain lions is the feeding of other wildlife.

“We get lion calls quite often,” Pebworth said. “This presentation will help the public understand the difference between normal lion behavior and other behaviors of concern. There also are a lot of stories associated with lions that simply aren’t true.”

Pebworth plans to share some of the more entertaining calls that his office has received about mountain lions.

The Summer Wildlife Series concludes July 29 with a presentation on “Habitat and Wildlife.” For more information, call (928) 692-7700.

Summer Wildlife Series moves from terrestrial to aquatic

Roundtail_ChubKINGMAN — The Summer Wildlife Series, presented by the Arizona Game and Fish Department’s regional office in Kingman, has remained on solid ground – until now.

After kicking off the ninth season of its popular program last month with a presentation on the desert tortoise, department personnel will shift from land to water and conduct a one-hour lecture on native Colorado River fishes, beginning at 6 p.m. June 16 at the Kingman Mohave County Library, 3269 N. Burbank St., in Kingman.

The event is free, although seating capacity is limited to 52 on a first-come, first-served basis.

David Partridge, aquatic wildlife specialist, will discuss different species of native fish, provide biological information, explain which fish can be caught by anglers, and the importance of reintroductions and protections. Partridge also will provide tips on where species that qualify as sport fish can be caught, as well as the best types of bait.

Some of the fish to be discussed will include roundtail chub (photo), various species of suckers and dace, and the relationship between many fish species. Matt Chmiel, the region’s aquatic program manager, said most Arizona residents know little about the state’s native fish.

“This presentation will provide people of all ages with an opportunity to come and learn about these species of fish that have learned over years how to survive in the harsh Arizona environment,” Chmiel said.

The series continues with mountain lions (July 8) and Habitat and Wildlife (July 29). For more information, call (928) 692-7700.

Desert tortoise kicks off Summer Wildlife Series in Kingman

Desert Tortoise Photo by George Andrejko, Arizona Game and Fish Department.

Desert Tortoise
Photo by George Andrejko, Arizona Game and Fish Department.

KINGMAN — The Arizona Game and Fish Department’s regional office in Kingman will begin the ninth season of its popular Summer Wildlife Series on May 27 with a free, one-hour presentation on the desert tortoise.

Heather Heimann, terrestrial wildlife technician, will discuss the slow-moving but determined reptile and its habitat, beginning at 6 p.m. at the Kingman Mohave County Library, 3269 N. Burbank St., in Kingman. Heimann will cover tortoise biology, impacts of disease, habitat, and the department’s tortoise adoption program.

The presentation will include a live tortoise. Game and Fish personnel will be available to answer questions following the presentation. The main portion of the library will be open to accommodate a larger crowd.

“The tortoise is a fascinating animal,” Heimann said. “They live in an area where people probably wouldn’t expect to find them. They’re well-adapted for life in this environment.”

For more information, call (928) 692-7700.